Residential






1
Was built ca 1890, and is Queen Anne style, with wonderful orange pressed brick, dominated by an unusual central tower. It is one of the very few large houses built in the historic Cottage Hill District during the latter part of the 1800s. Many pre-Civil War mansions were constructed up […]

The Mills House










Yost Res 1
For almost a half century this imposing house at 3191 Thomas Avenue was the Yost Residence. Back 70 years ago the property was so big it took two yardmen to keep it up (of course you didn’t have blow & go machines then). Mr Walter Yost was in the lumber […]

Yost Residence


Eagles Nest
Back 60 to 70 years ago this house at 3541 Thomas Avenue was the Eagle’s Nest, but today its picture is interesting because of the arbor formed by the trees lining the short entrance drive. It makes you feel like you are entering a special place.  But back 60+ years […]

Eagle’s Nest



Thigpen House 1
The very impressive Thigpen House. . . at 1412 South Perry, situated at the head of Clanton Avenue. This was probably built around the turn of the previous century and seems to be a blend of Greek Revival and Italianate. The Thigpen Family lived here for neigh onto a half-century, […]

Thigpen House


Louis Whitfield House
Louis B Whitfield Jr’s modern style residence at 2080 Allendale Road was built circa 1930, about the time the road was opened. As a young man, Junior faced the daunting task of following in his father’s footsteps. The Senior Whitfield had started the ALAGA Syrup Company in 1906, and subsequently […]

Louis B Whitfield Jr. House





Goldwater Sweep 1
This Frank Lockwood design at 3230 Thomas Avenue was built ca 1930 by Alphonse Levy, who was founder and president of the highly regarded Al Levy’s, a ladies apparel store on Montgomery Street downtown.  The house is a good example of Lockwood’s penchant for “drunken brickwork”, and lends veracity to […]

Goldwater Sweep




Lewis House
This house has been cited as one of Montgomery’s finest examples of the California Bungalow/ Craftsman Style residence. Sadly, the present owners are allowing the lines and details to be obscured by vegetation. Nonetheless, behind the distinctive triple gable, the house boasts 11-foot ceilings, a basement, decorative rafter ends, and […]

Lewis House



GWTN Mansion 1
I just knew this impressive GWTW Mansion at 3245 Thomas Avenue had a story to tell, but I just couldn’t find it. I knew it was the home of RR Equip mogul Royce Kershaw in 1946, and five years later it was the dwelling of William Thames, founder of Thames […]

GWTN Mansion



Algernon Blair House
Blair built it in 1904 for his wife Carolyne. She and their three children had just left Macon GA to join him in Montgomery where Blair had found success as a building contractor. But Carolyne died the very next year, and while Algernon remarried a few years later (into the […]

Algernon Blair House



Belvoir Mansion
at 3250 Thomas Avenue, was built in the mid-1920s, when Thomas was little more than a country lane. The large estate is surrounded by an intimidating wall, and the structure appears to be a blending of Washington’s neo-classical Georgian Mount Vernon, and Thomas Jefferson’s penchant for Palladian style. In French, […]

Belvoir Mansion



Upchurch Residence
AKA Monticello lives on, at 2233 Woodley Road was built by Ken Upchurch Sr to fulfill a lifelong ambition. Ken founded Upchurch Construction Co in 1930, a venture that still exists today, carried on by Ken Jr, and now Ken III. Ken Sr spent 30 years planning and dreaming about […]

Upchurch Residence


Hillcrest
the one-time home of the Montgomery  Federation of Garden Clubs. The Federation purchased the former residence of Judge William Hill in the late 1960s, and for at least 35 years it used the facility to stage weddings, receptions, luncheons, teas and meetings. Garden parties amidst the lush landscaping were a […]

Hillcrest


Falconer
was built ca 1845, but was moved from its original location at the SW corner of Perry & Alabama, to make way for a parking lot (it now sits directly behind Knox Hall). Much of the structure was lost in the move. Falconer had little to do with the house; […]

Falconer House